Barnyard Crack/Patch

Barnyard Welcome to the yard where the world of Nickelodeon's Barnyard movie will come to life. Players start off as the 'new cow on the block,' form alliances with fellow animals, taking on challenges and sporting competitions, protecting the farm from coyote invaders, and doing lots of goofing off on the side. Players will be able to explore a fully interactive, 3D world and prove that they have what it takes to be the biggest party animal of all. Interact with your favorite Barnyard characters from the movie as you form alliances, join teams, go on quests and play mini-games. Competitive and co-operative multi-player mini-game action for up to four players. Free-form gameplay through areas like Walnut Woods, Dankweed Pond and the Barnyard itself. Environment and gameplay change as nights and days of the week pass on the farm. [THQ]

Download Barnyard Crack/Patch

Released date
Platform PC Windows
Rating 69 / 100
User rating
8.8
Downloads 659
Genre Action, General
Players 1 Player
Company / Developer
THQ / Blue Tongue Entertainment

Barnyard reviews ( 2 )

Furious_Fingus, Sep 13, 2017

I think this review of The Godfather from Roger Albert best describes barnyard: " We know from Gay Talese’s book Honor Thy Father that being a professional mobster isn’t all sunshine and roses. More often, it’s the boredom of stuffy rooms and a bad diet of carry-out food, punctuated by brief, terrible bursts of violence. This is exactly the feel of “The Godfather,” which brushes aside the flashy glamour of the traditional gangster picture and gives us what’s left: fierce tribal loyalties, deadly little neighborhood quarrels in Brooklyn, and a form of vengeance to match every affront. ADVERTISEMENT The remarkable thing about Mario Puzo’s novel was the way it seemed to be told from the inside out; he didn’t give us a world of international intrigue, but a private club as constricted as the seventh grade. Everybody knew everybody else and had a pretty shrewd hunch what they were up to. The movie (based on a script labored over for some time by Puzo and then finally given form, I suspect, by director Francis Ford Coppola) gets the same feel. We tend to identify with Don Corleone’s family not because we dig gang wars, but because we have been with them from the beginning, watching them wait for battle while sitting at the kitchen table and eating chow mein out of paper cartons. “The Godfather” himself is not even the central character in the drama. That position goes to the youngest, brightest son, Michael, who understands the nature of his father’s position while revising his old-fashioned ways. The Godfather’s role in the family enterprise is described by his name; he stands outside the next generation which will carry on and, hopefully, angle the family into legitimate enterprises. Those who have read the novel may be surprised to find Michael at the center of the movie, instead of Don Corleone. In fact, this is simply an economical way for Coppola to get at the heart of the Puzo story, which dealt with the transfer of power within the family. Marlon Brando, who plays the Godfather as a shrewd, unbreakable old man, actually has the character lead in the movie; Al Pacino, with a brilliantly developed performance as Michael, is the lead. But Brando’s performance is a skillful throwaway, even though it earned him an Academy Award for best actor. His voice is wheezy and whispery, and his physical movements deliberately lack precision; the effect is of a man so accustomed to power that he no longer needs to remind others. Brando does look the part of old Don Corleone, mostly because of acting and partly because of the makeup, although he seems to have stuffed a little too much cotton into his jowls, making his lower face immobile. The rest of the actors supply one example after another of inspired casting. Although “The Godfather” is a long, minutely detailed movie of some three hours, there naturally isn’t time to go into the backgrounds and identities of such characters as Clemenza, the family lieutenant; Jack Woltz, the movie czar; Luca Brasi, the loyal professional killer; McCluskey, the crooked cop; and the rest. Coppola and producer Al Ruddy skirt this problem with understated typecasting. As the Irish cop, for example, they simply slide in Sterling Hayden and let the character go about his business. Richard Castellano is an unshakable Clemenza. John Marley makes a perfectly hateful Hollywood mogul (and, yes, he still wakes up to find he’ll have to cancel his day at the races). ADVERTISEMENT The success of “The Godfather” as a novel was largely due to a series of unforgettable scenes. Puzo is a good storyteller, but no great shakes as a writer. The movie gives almost everything in the novel except the gynecological repair job. It doesn’t miss a single killing; it opens with the wedding of Don Corleone’s daughter (and attendant upstairs activity); and there are the right number of auto bombs, double crosses, and garrotings. Coppola has found a style and a visual look for all this material so “The Godfather” becomes something of a rarity: a really good movie squeezed from a bestseller. The decision to shoot everything in period decor (the middle and late 1940s) was crucial; if they’d tried to save money as they originally planned, by bringing everything up-to-date, the movie simply wouldn’t have worked. But it’s uncannily successful as a period piece, filled with sleek, bulging limousines and postwar fedoras. Coppola and his cinematographer, Gordon Willis, also do some interesting things with the color photography. The earlier scenes have a reddish-brown tint, slightly overexposed and feeling like nothing so much as a 1946 newspaper rotogravure supplement."

russiangamer, Nov 28, 2016

Очень крутая и даже довольно атмосферная аркада. Куча классных мини-игр, небольшая, но всё же открытая карта ( открывается по мере прохождения). А так же куча секретов и другие плюшки. Ближе к концу всё же приедается, на сколько помню, так и не прошёл. Отличная аркада на пару вечеров.